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Artificial Sweeteners. Currently, there are five main artificial sweeteners that are officially approved by the FDA (Food and Drug Administration): Saccharin, Aspartame, Acesulfame-potassium, Sucralose, and Neotame. These artificial sweeteners are regularly used in everything from baked goods to soft drinks, chewing gum to frozen foods, jams and jellies to children’s medicine tablets, not to mention everyday tabletop sweeteners. They have been enjoying very prominent success as they bring in billions of dollars worth of profits to their producers, while growing in even greater demand. Mintel's Global New Products Database recorded 3,920 product launches containing artificial sweeteners between 2000 and 2005 in the US alone. But the supposed success of artificial sweeteners does not come from their product quality or their benefits to society. On the contrary, there have been a large number of negative symptoms, diseases and disorders, cancers, deaths, and other health problems linked to artificial sweeteners. The only reason their sales and profits seem to be ever-increasing is that they are able to be easily, inexpensively mass-produced, while allowing companies to advertise that their products are “diet” or “sugar-free.” The supposed triumph of the discovery of artificial sweeteners ultimately led to the tragedy of harmful negative side effects on society.
The triumph of the discovery and mass-production of artificial sweeteners was only a masked covering of major companies’ selfish motives and the tragedy that was to follow. Almost all artificial sweeteners were not planned or researched, but were actually discovered accidentally while working with various chemicals in the laboratory. Companies, seeking profit from their newly discovered product, would hire their own scientists to perform safety studies on these sweeteners until they had enough positive results for them to be approved. The marketing of artificial sweeteners, going all the way back to 1884, proved to be based not on trying to improve health, help diabetics, or enhance flavor, but was based primarily on big businesses making profits.